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Home > News & Blog > Be Prepared! Ticketed Entry Reservations, Know Which Park’s Will Have Them in 2022

Posted: May 24, 2022

With summer visitation to our National Parks growing each year, some parks now require entry reservations for certain areas or all of the park. In some cases, this is in addition to the normal park entrance fees, camping fees or wilderness permit fees. Below is information for the National Parks with a entry reservations system in place for Summer 2022. If anything changes with these or more parks are added, we will update this page with the latest (so don’t forget to bookmark this page).

Acadia National Park

Buses, cars, and pedestrians on Cadillac Summit Road
Buses, cars, and bicyclists attempt to navigate a tight turn on the Cadillac Summit Road

May 25 through Oct. 22
Cadillac Summit Road

Acadia is among the top ten most popular national parks in the United States, with more than 4 million visits a year. Visitation has surged almost 60 percent in a decade, leading to severe crowding at many park destinations. Vehicle reservations are required for Cadillac Summit Road from May 25 through Oct 22. Vehicle reservations are not required for any other areas of the park, or for visitors who enter the area by foot, bike, or taxi. Cadillac is not served by the Island Explorer bus system. Visitors must have a park entrance pass to enter the park in addition to purchasing a vehicle reservation for Cadillac Summit Road.

Vehicle reservations cost $6. They are sold online in advance at Recreation.gov. They are not available for purchase at the park. Vehicle reservations are sold on a rolling basis. Thirty percent of vehicle reservations are made available 90 days ahead of each date. The remaining 70 percent are released at 10 am ET two days ahead. You will need to print or save a digital copy of the vehicle reservation with the confirmation QR code, which will be scanned to verify the reservation. Be aware, connectivity is unreliable in the park.

For more information about the Acadia National Park Cadillac Summit Road Reservations, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Arches National Park

Visitors gather near Delicate Arch in Arches National Park where in 2022 Pilot Timed Entry Reservations will be required.
Visitors gather near Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Apr. 3 through Oct. 3
Full Park Pilot Timed Entry System

Between 2009 and 2019, visitation to Arches National Park grew over 66 percent, from 996,312 to 1,659,702 visitors per year. This dramatic rise in visitation has increased entrance line wait times, parking lot congestion, and crowding on trails, which can negatively impact visitor experiences, visitor safety, and park resources.

In 2021, the NPS determined that a temporary timed entry pilot could help Arches proactively pace visitation into the park. Timed entry reservations may provide more reliable park access and improve visitor experiences—all while protecting Arches’ extraordinary landscape.

From April 3 to October 3, 2022 Arches will implement a temporary, pilot timed entry system to help manage traffic and improve visitor experiences. To enter the park visitors will need three things:

  1. Timed Entry Ticket
  2. Photo ID
  3. Park Entrance Fee OR valid Park Pass (includes Annual, Senior, Access, Military, 4th Grade, or Volunteer passes)

Ticketed entry will run from 6am to 5pm daily.

For more information about the Arches National Park Pilot Timed Entry System, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Carlsbad Caverns National Park

View from Rock of Ages, Big Room, in Carlsbad Caverns National Park
View from Rock of Ages, Big Room, in Carlsbad Caverns National Park

Until Further Notice
Cavern Entrance Reservations

Due to crowds, an enclosed space and the COVID-19 pandemic, reservations are required to enter the cavern in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, until further notice. Reservations must be purchased online through Recreation.gov or by calling 877-444-6777. No reservations are available at the park. Reservations only select the entry time. All park visitors must purchase an entry ticket or present a valid National Park pass upon arrival. Pass holders must still reserve an entry time through a method mentioned above.

For more information about the Carlsbad Caverns National Park Cavern Entrance Reservation System, visit the Recreation.gov page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Glacier National Park

Cruising to St. Mary on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park
A scenic drive on Going-to-the-Sun Road has been a popular activity since the early 1930s

May 27 through Sep. 11
Going-to-the-Sun Road & the North Fork Area Reservations

For the second year, and now expanded, the pilot program is an effort to reduce congestion, improve visitor experience, and protect park resources. When the vehicle reservation system is in effect, a vehicle reservation is required to access the Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor and North Fork Vehicle Reservation Areas. The vehicle reservation system only applies to these two areas of the park from May 27 to September 11.

A Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor Vehicle Reservation is required for each vehicle accessing the Going-to-the-Sun Road Corridor Reservation Area from May 27 through September 11, 2022, from 6am to 4pm.  This area includes all points between the West Entrance Station, Camas Entrance Station, and Rising Sun checkpoint (located 6 miles west of the St. Mary Entrance).

  • Vehicle reservations to access the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor west of the Rising Sun checkpoint from the St. Mary Entrance will not be required until the full length of Going-to-the-Sun Road opens for the season (i.e., typically late June).
  • Visitors with service reservations along the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor do not need a vehicle reservation. Valid service reservations will serve as a vehicle reservation for the day of the service reservation.
    • Valid service reservations include lodging, camping, commercial tours, etc. in areas located inside the West Entrance, Camas Entrance, and St. Mary Entrance.
  • Vehicle reservations are not required for tribal members, landowners inside the vehicle reservation area and their guests, or visitors who enter by foot or bike.
  • Vehicle reservations and service reservations do not guarantee parking spaces in popular areas. Expect congested and busy conditions throughout the park.

A North Fork Vehicle Reservation is required for each vehicle accessing the North Fork area of the park through the Polebridge Entrance Station from May 27 through September 11, 2022, from 6 am to 6 pm. This area is in the northwest corner of the park and includes all points east of the Polebridge Entrance Station.

  • Vehicle reservations are not required for tribal members, landowners inside the vehicle reservation area and their guests, or visitors who enter by foot or bike.
  • Valid service reservations will serve as a vehicle reservation for the North Fork area of the park for the day of the service reservation.
    • Valid service reservations are limited to wilderness camping permits for trailheads located in the North Fork area of the park and registered campers at first-come, first-served campgrounds in the North Fork area of the park.
    • Proof of a valid service reservation will serve as a vehicle reservation for the day of the service reservation only.
    • Service reservations outside of the North Fork area of the park (west of the Polebridge Entrance Station) will not serve as valid vehicle reservations.
  • Vehicle reservations do not guarantee parking spaces in popular areas. Expect congested and busy conditions throughout the area.

For more information about the Glacier National Park Going-to-the-Sun Road & the North Fork Area Reservations, visit the NPS page here. Here is a map with the effected roads and areas from the NPS.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Haleakalā National Park

Haleakalā Sunrise in Haleakalā National Park
Haleakalā Sunrise in Haleakalā National Park

Until Further Notice
Summit Sunrise Reservations

Haleakalā National Park is home to Maui’s highest peak. Rising 10,023 (3,005 m) feet above sea level, Haleakala means “house of the sun” and is where demigod Maui lassoed the sun, slowing its passage so people had more time to dry kapa (cloth) and grow food. The dormant volcano’s “crater” is actually a valley carved by erosion. Sunrise at the summit of Haleakala has been a visitor attraction since the late 1800s.

Due to the popularity of sunrise viewing at the summit and limited parking, Haleakalā National Park now requires reservations for each vehicle entering the park before sunrise (3:00 am to 7:00 am). Reservations can be made online up to 60 days in advance of your sunrise visit on recreation.gov and are only valid for the day reserved. These tickets are released at 7:00 am HST. A portion of reservations for any given day will be released 2 days (48 hours) in advance A visitor may only purchase one sunrise reservation per three-day period. Upon arrival, please have the reservation holder present with valid ID, reservation confirmation email, and your park pass or a way to purchase one.

Reservations are not refunded or exchanged due to weather.

For more information about the Haleakalā National Park Summit Sunrise Reservations, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park Entrance Station Traffic where in 2022 Timed Permit Entry Reservations will be required.
Rocky Mountain National Park Entrance Station Traffic

May 27 and Oct. 10
Full Park Timed Permit Entry Reservations

Rocky Mountain National Park is one of the busiest national parks, third in the country in 2019 with over 4.6 million visitors. This represents a 42 percent increase in visitation in seven years.

Visitor crowding and congestion at Rocky Mountain National Park have led to increased negative impacts to visitor and staff safety, resource protection, visitor experience and operational capacity. The park has piloted various visitor use management strategies over the last six years, including managing vehicle access to first-come, first served (2016-2019) in highly congested areas. These first-come, first-served restrictions had some limited success initially, but over time began to lose effectiveness.

The park piloted different park wide timed entry permit reservation systems (2020-2021) and will be piloting a system again in 2022. Timed Entry Reservations will be required to enter the park between May 27 and October 10, 2022. To enter the park during the summer season will require two things: A Timed Entry Permit or a reservation with a service, such as an in-park camping reservation, horseback riding reservation, or commercial tours (Service Reservation); Plus a Park Pass or Entrance Fee for your vehicle.

There are two types of reservations available. One permit will be for the Bear Lake Road Corridor, which will include the entire corridor and access to the rest of the park. The second permit will be for the rest of Rocky Mountain National Park, excluding the Bear Lake Road corridor. Timed Entry Reservations are free but require a nonrefundable $2 reservation processing fee.

For more information about the Rocky Mountain National Park Timed Permit Entry Reservations, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Shenandoah National Park

Old Rag Hikers in Shenandoah National Park
Old Rag Hikers in Shenandoah National Park

Mar. 1 through Nov 30
Old Rag Area (Saddle, Ridge, and Ridge Access) Reservations

A recent visitor-use and expectations study indicated significant crowding and congestion at Old Rag, one of the Shenandoah National Park’s most popular hiking destinations, during certain times of the year. The study also revealed that most visitors agree that limiting users would improve their experience and safety, and better protect the rare ecological communities found on Old Rag.

Due to this, from March 1 – November 30, 2022, visitors to Old Rag Mountain, including hikers on the Saddle, Ridge, and Ridge Access trails, need to obtain an Old Rag day-use ticket in advance, in addition to a Park entrance pass. This pilot project is intended to improve the visitor experience and address public safety concerns, while also better protecting the rare ecological communities found on Old Rag. Park management will evaluate the results at the end of the pilot project , share its analysis, and adapt to a permanent system in the future.

During the one-year pilot project, each Old Rag day-use ticket will cost $1.00. Purchase Old Rag day-use tickets online through Recreation.gov in advance or by calling 877-444-6777. Tickets will not be sold in person at the Old Rag entrance station, because there is currently no internet service at the station. Also be aware that cell service is not reliable at the Old Rag entrance station, so plan to purchase your ticket before arriving in the Park.

For more information about the Shenandoah National Park Old Rag Area Reservations, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Yosemite National Park

Yosemite Falls in Yosemite National Park where in 2022 Peak-Hours Entry Reservations will be required.
Yosemite Falls in Yosemite National Park

May 20 through Sep. 30
Full Park Peak-Hours Entry Reservations

Traffic congestion has been a major issue for about five decades, seriously impacting visitors’ experience in Yosemite and the source of frequent complaints. One of the five goals of the park’s 1980 General Management Plan is to “markedly reduce traffic congestion.” The Merced River and Tuolumne River Plans (both finalized in 2014) address congestion and crowding in Yosemite Valley and Tuolumne Meadows, respectively. This summer’s peak hours system will provide both data and a test case as one pathway to a permanent solution for this persistent issue. Long-term implementation of strategies to reduce congestion and crowding will include public and stakeholder input.

A reservation will be required to drive into or through Yosemite National Park from May 20 through September 30, 2022, for those driving into the park between 6 am and 4 pm. Driving through the park will also require a reservation if entering between 6 am and 4 pm. The temporary reservation system will help manage congestion and provide a quality visitor experience while numerous key visitor attractions are closed for critical infrastructure repairs.

Seventy percent of reservations for all dates from May 20 through September 30, 2022, will be available on Recreation.gov starting March 23. Thirty percent of reservations will be available seven days before the arrival date (e.g., make a reservation for an arrival date of September 30 on September 23).

Reservations are available each day at 8 am Pacific time. Reservations are taken almost immediately. Be sure to have a Recreation.gov account and be logged in and ready to get a reservation promptly at 8 am Pacific daylight time.

The non-refundable reservation fee is $2 (this does not include the $35-per-car park entrance fee). Each user can make one reservation for each three-day period. Peak-hours reservations are valid for three consecutive days (including arrival date). If you don’t have computer access, you can call 877-444-6777 to make a reservation.

If you have a reservation for one of the following, you do not need an additional reservation. You still pay the $35-per-car entrance fee upon arrival, unless you have an annual or lifetime pass. Your reservation for in-park lodging or camping, a Half Dome permit, or a wilderness permit allows you to enter the park 24 hours per day for the duration of your reservation or for three days (whichever is longer).

For more information about the Yosemite National Park Peak-Hours Entry Reservations, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Zion National Park

Hikers near the Angels Landing chain
Hikers waiting to climb near Angels Landing in Zion National Park

On & After April 1
Angels Landing Pilot Permit Program

Angels Landing is one of the most popular destinations in Zion National Park. Many who go there want to experience untamed adventure and get a classic photograph. Its’ now famous name descends from Methodist minister Frederick Vining Fisher who, on his first visit to Zion Canyon in 1916 allegedly quipped only an angel could land there. The hike is very strenuous.

In response to concerns about crowding and congestion on the trail, on and after April 1, 2022, everyone who hikes Angels Landing needs to have a permit. The pilot permit program reflects lessons learned when we metered the number of hikers on the trail in 2019 and 2021 and by distributing tickets to use the park shuttle system in response to COVID-19 in 2020.

You can apply for a permit before your trip. There are two options to acquire one. The first is through a seasonal lottery and the second is a day-before lottery. It costs $6 to apply for a permit. The fee covers an application for up to 6 people (including the person filling out the application). This fee is non-refundable.

For more information about the Zion National Park Angels Landing Pilot Permit Program, visit the NPS page here.

Learn more about this park on the Discover Our Parks page here!

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Note on Campgrounds & Other Permits in all US National Parks!

Cut Bank Campground in Glacier National Park
Cut Bank Campground in Glacier National Park

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, most National Parks had a mix of campgrounds for reservation and first-come, first-served. As the parks deal with more congestion and an increase in visitation, many of the previous campgrounds and back-country permits that were first-come, first-served are now only by reservation.

Most of these parks have also required the reservations to be made online through Recreation.gov. Whether you are planning a camping trip, backpacking trip or wilderness adventure, be sure to look at the National Park Service pages and read all alerts before planning your trip. You can also visit Recreation.gov and search for the park you would like to visit and look at all the reservable permits and campgrounds to ensure you are all set before hitting the road for an amazing trip.

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