fbpx

COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PARK FULLY OPEN

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas Social Distancing Required
Click this box for more information.
If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know by using the link after clicking this box.

COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PARK FULLY OPEN

If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know here.
So what does "Park Fully Open" mean?

According to the U.S. National Park Service, Glacier National Park is currently fully open. This means all operations are back to normal. This can mean there are still restrictions on social distancing, travel and/or masks. Visit the source link below for more detailed information regarding this park's status.

What we know:

The below source link has some information about the status of the park. The National Park Service requires everyone at this park, regardless of vaccination status, to continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces, such as narrow/busy trails, overlooks, visitor center patios, & other congested areas.

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas

Glacier National Park is currently requiring masks or face coverings in certain or all areas. Depending on your vaccination status, if you are not fully vaccinated (meaning two weeks after your final vaccination), and according to CDC guidelines, which currently depends on the COVID-19 transmissibility rate in the community in and around the park. Most parks requiring masks indoors have put an alert out (found below in the Alerts section). Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service, the state of Montana and the local community for more detailed information.

Social Distancing Required

Glacier National Park is currently requiring everyone to social distance, 6 feet or more, from others. This usually means outside of your immediate group. Some parks may also have size restrictions on gatherings to help assist in social distancing. Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service, the state of Montana and the local community for more detailed information.

Last Updated: September 14, 2021
Loading...Loading Park Alerts...

Park Alerts (3)

***Discover Our Parks, LLC takes no responsability in the accuracy of these alerts, which are taken directly from NPS.gov, and we provide them for informational purposes only. Please refer to NPS.gov for more information.

About Glacier National Park

Surrounded by wilderness, bordered by Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and two forks of the Flathead Wild and Scenic River, Glacier National Park is part of one of the largest, most intact ecosystems in North America—the Crown of the Continent. Together with Waterton Lakes National Park it is the world’s first international peace park, a world heritage site, and a biosphere reserve. Most of the park is also recommended wilderness.

Surrounded by wilderness, bordered by Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and two forks of the Flathead Wild and Scenic River, Glacier National Park is part of one of the largest, most intact ecosystems in North America—the Crown of the Continent. Together with Waterton Lakes National Park it is the world’s first international peace park, a world heritage site, and a biosphere reserve. Most of the park is also recommended wilderness.

In 1932, Glacier National Park became a portion of the world’s first international peace park along with Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park, named Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. This designation was legislated by the U.S. and Canadian governments to promote international cooperation and peace, and beyond guiding park management, it also serves as a model that has been repeated around the world.

The park lies on the North American Continental Divide, at the center of the Crown of the Continent ecosystem, an area which encompasses approximately 18 million acres and includes other public lands in Canada and the U.S. including national forests, wilderness areas, and Canadian national and provincial parks. This area is a large and mostly intact ecosystem, home to the entire suite of North America’s endemic large carnivores and the greatest floristic and aquatic biodiversity in the Rocky Mountains.

Species such as the bald eagle, and North America’s indigenous carnivores, including the grizzly and black bear, gray wolf, wolverine, and cougar live and travel through the park. The headwaters of major river systems are found within the park, including rivers that flow to the Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Hudson Bay.

Glacier National Park’s resources and landscapes have drawn people to the region for 10,000 years. The 338 archeological sites and 397 historic properties document the physical evidence of human activity and the importance of the area to American Indians, First Nations, explorers, homesteaders, entrepreneurs, visitors, and scientists.

Today, the park attracts more than two million visitors a year from all over the world. Visitors are able to enjoy the park in their own vehicles or board an iconic red bus to ascend the Goingto-the-Sun Road to Logan Pass and cross the Continental Divide. Boundless opportunities exist to experience solitude and truly dark night skies in the backcountry of Glacier National Park. Approximately 735 miles of horse and foot trails interweave almost all sections of the park and allow visitors opportunities to experience the many facets of Glacier National Park.

Conditions within and around the park have changed significantly over the years, and new threats and issues such as climate change and energy development challenge park managers. Park managers are working with neighboring agencies and partners in Montana and Canada to address the changes in nearby land management, increasing visitation, and climate change while striving to meet the National Park Service mission to leave park resources unimpaired for future generations. And, because Glacier is the world’s first international peace park, park managers are working to foster transboundary protected areas and peace and cooperation between nations.

Source: Foundation Document – Glacier National Park

| Come and experience Glacier’s pristine forests, alpine meadows, rugged mountains, and spectacular lakes. With over 700 miles of trails, Glacier is a hiker’s paradise for adventurous visitors seeking wilderness and solitude. Relive the days of old through historic chalets, lodges, and the famous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Explore Glacier National Park and discover what awaits you. | Glacier National Park | Montana | https://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm

Fast Facts:

Date the Park was Established:May 11, 1910
Park Area (as of 2019):1,013,125.99 acres (4,100.0 km2)
Recreational Visitors (2018 Total):2965309 visitors

Park Weather

Glacier's weather is highly variable and can be extreme. Expect warm sunny summer days and in the winter the temperatures can fall well below freezing. Glacier's geography, straddling the Continental Divide, sets the stage for clashes of two very different climates. Warm, wet Pacific air moves in from the west, and cold dry Arctic air from the northeast. They meet at the Divide.