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COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PARK FULLY OPEN

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas Social Distancing Required
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If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know by using the link after clicking this box.

COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PARK FULLY OPEN

If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know here.
So what does "Park Fully Open" mean?

According to the U.S. National Park Service, Biscayne National Park is currently fully open. This means all operations are back to normal. This can mean there are still restrictions on social distancing, travel and/or masks. Visit the source link below for more detailed information regarding this park's status.

What we know:

The below source link has more information about the status of the park. The National Park Service requires everyone at this park, regardless of vaccination status, to continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces, such as narrow/busy trails, overlooks, visitor center patios, & other congested areas.

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas

Biscayne National Park is currently requiring masks or face coverings in certain or all areas. Depending on your vaccination status, if you are not fully vaccinated (meaning two weeks after your final vaccination), and according to CDC guidelines, which currently depends on the COVID-19 transmissibility rate in the community in and around the park. Most parks requiring masks indoors have put an alert out (found below in the Alerts section). Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service, the state of Florida and the local community for more detailed information.

Social Distancing Required

Biscayne National Park is currently requiring everyone to social distance, 6 feet or more, from others. This usually means outside of your immediate group. Some parks may also have size restrictions on gatherings to help assist in social distancing. Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service, the state of Florida and the local community for more detailed information.

Last Updated: September 1, 2021
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Park Alerts (4)

***Discover Our Parks, LLC takes no responsability in the accuracy of these alerts, which are taken directly from NPS.gov, and we provide them for informational purposes only. Please refer to NPS.gov for more information.

About Biscayne National Park

Biscayne National Park was established in order to preserve and protect for the education, inspiration, recreation, and enjoyment of present and future generations a rare combination of terrestrial, marine, and amphibious life in a tropical setting of great natural beauty.

Biscayne National Park is located south of Miami, Florida. It is a marine park consisting of mostly submerged land and includes coral reefs, sandy shoals, 4,825 acres of mostly undeveloped mangrove shoreline, and more than 40 keys or islands primarily composed of limestone and coral. The primary means of access to park waters is by private, partner, or commercial permit holding operators. Visitors come to the area for recreational opportunities including boating, fishing, snorkeling, SCUBA diving, paddling, birding, and nature viewing.

Biscayne National Park is recognized for its natural resources, which represent a combination of terrestrial, estuarine, and marine resources in a subtropical setting of great natural beauty. The park can be divided generally into four prominent ecosystems: (1) terrestrial mangrove shorelines, (2) shallow estuarine system (Biscayne Bay) with diverse bottom communities, (3) keys (islands), and (4) coral reefs and hard bottom habitat. The coral reefs of Biscayne National Park are due east of the keys and are part of the Florida Reef Tract that stretches from the Dry Tortugas to Martin County. Much of the northern part of the Florida Reef Tract is in the park and makes up much of the northernmost extension of living coral reefs in the United States. Most of the shallow, protected waters of Biscayne Bay contain the estuarine environment of the park, which primarily supports seagrasses and hard bottom communities.

Biscayne National Park has a rich history of aboriginal occupation and use, Spanish and English exploration, pirates, smuggling, shipwrecks, marine salvaging, agriculture, and commercial development that reflects the continual link between humans and the sea that has characterized this area for the past 10,000 years.

Remnants of this cultural history are present throughout the park and are represented by both terrestrial and submerged cultural resources. Terrestrial cultural resources include Native American occupation sites as well as historic structures, ruins, homesteads, and farmsteads. Submerged and shoreline cultural resources include materials associated with prehistoric sites as well as historic shipwrecks, ship strandings, wharfs and piers, and the remains of other structures and materials along the water’s edge. Because of the park’s natural history of rising sea levels, former terrestrial sites (possibly early prehistoric ones) may now be under water.

Remnants of this cultural history are present throughout the park and are represented by both terrestrial and submerged cultural resources. Terrestrial cultural resources include Native American occupation sites as well as historic structures, ruins, homesteads, and farmsteads. Submerged and shoreline cultural resources include materials associated with prehistoric sites as well as historic shipwrecks, ship strandings, wharfs and piers, and the remains of other structures and materials along the water’s edge. Because of the park’s natural history of rising sea levels, former terrestrial sites (possibly early prehistoric ones) may now be under water.

Source: Foundation Document Overview – Biscayne National Park

| Within sight of downtown Miami, yet worlds away, Biscayne protects a rare combination of aquamarine waters, emerald islands, and fish-bejeweled coral reefs. Here too is evidence of 10,000 years of human history, from pirates and shipwrecks to pineapple farmers and presidents. Outdoors enthusiasts can boat, snorkel, camp, watch wildlife…or simply relax in a rocking chair gazing out over the bay. | Biscayne National Park | Florida | https://www.nps.gov/bisc/index.htm

Fast Facts:

Date the Park was Established:June 28, 1980
Park Area (as of 2019):172,971.11 acres (700.0 km2)
Recreational Visitors (2018 Total):469253 visitors

Park Weather

The park is situated in a subtropical climate, which ensures sunshine year-round. Winters are normally dry and mild, with occasional fronts bringing wind and little rain. Summer brings hot and humid weather with scattered thunderstorms in the afternoons. The average temperature in January is 68 degrees Fahrenheit and 82 in July. The average rainfall for the area is 2.17 inches in January and 3.95 inches in July. June to November is hurricane season.