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COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

CAMPGROUND PHASED REOPENING

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas Social Distancing Required Visitors Centers, Stores and/or Other Facilities Closed
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If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know by using the link after clicking this box.

COVID-19 STATUS: KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

CAMPGROUND PHASED REOPENING

If you believe this information is incorrect or needs updating, please let us know here.
So what does "Campground Phased Reopening" mean?

According to the U.S. National Park Service, Cataloochee Campground is currently working on reopening. This can mean that certain areas and facilities are closed. Visit the source link below for more detailed information regarding this park's status.

What we know:

The below source link has more information about the status of the campgrounds within the park. The National Park Service requires everyone at this park, regardless of vaccination status, to continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces, such as narrow/busy trails, overlooks, visitor center patios, & other congested areas.

Face Masks or Coverings Required in Certain Areas

Cataloochee Campground is currently requiring masks or face coverings in certain or all areas. Depending on your vaccination status, if you are not fully vaccinated (meaning two weeks after your final vaccination), and according to CDC guidelines, which currently depends on the COVID-19 transmissibility rate in the community in and around the park. Most parks requiring masks indoors have put an alert out (found below in the Alerts section). Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service and the local community for more detailed information.

Social Distancing Required

Cataloochee Campground is currently requiring everyone to social distance, 6 feet or more, from others. This usually means outside of your immediate group. Some parks may also have size restrictions on gatherings to help assist in social distancing. Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service and the local community for more detailed information.

Visitors Centers, Stores and/or Other Facilities Closed

Cataloochee Campground currently has visitors centers, stores, or other facilities closed due to Covid-19. It is highly suggested that you bring all the supplies you may need in case a store is closed or shopping is limited due to local communities or the park. Please refer to the U.S. National Park Service and the local community for more detailed information.

Last Updated: September 16, 2021

Cataloochee Campground Overview

Cataloochee campground is located in the historic Cataloochee Valley--a relatively remote part of Smoky Mountain National Park. The secluded setting offers visitors the ability to enjoy a multitude of recreational activities like hiking and fishing, without the crowds, which are sometimes common in other parts of the park.
Recreation
The Cataloochee Valley features an extensive trail system that is less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The two main trails, Caldwell Fork and nearby Rough Fork Trail, run mostly parallel to one another in the central portion of the valley. Either of these trails extend alongside scenic creeks and streams and support both hikers and horeseback riders.

For hikers only, the 3.9-mile Boogerman Trail forms a nice loop off the Caldwell Fork Trail and is less than a mile walk from the campground.

Anglers will agree that some of the best Rainbow and Brook trout fishing in the area can be found in the Cataloochee Basin, one of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers.

The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park. A handful of which can be found in the Cataloochee Valley, including the nearby Palmer House, built in 1869, which contains a self-guided museum.
Facilities
Cataloochee offers a traditional outdoor camping experience with the added convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. There are no hookups or showers at the campground.

Hiking trails and fishing streams are easily accessible from the site and the nearby Cataloochee Group Camp can accommodate larger parties of guests.

Additionally, the Cataloochee Horse Camp provides convenient camping for horseback riding enthusiasts.
Natural Features
Cataloochee Campground is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges and pristine mountain streams, like nearby Cataloochee Creek. Elk are common in this part of the park, during the spring and fall.

At a 2,600 foot elevation, Cataloochee provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Whether blanketed in bright spring wildflowers or exploding with vivid fall colors, the scenery at Cataloochee never disappoints.
Nearby Attractions
A number of the park's famous historical buildings, including the Steve Woody and Caldwell Houses, both built in the late 19th-century, are nearby the campground.

The Steve Woody House, built in 1880, is located along the Rough Fork trail, an easy 2-mile roundtrip hike from the parking lot at the end of Ranger Station Road.
Directions to Campground

From I-40 take Exit 20 in North Carolina. Turn right onto Cove Creek Road and follow to the Park boundary. The road goes from pavement to gravel to pavement. Upon reaching the pavement the second time, turn left. Go 2.5 miles to an intersection and continue another .5 miles to the left.

This page includes information about Cataloochee Campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park | Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America’s most visited national park. | North Carolina, Tennessee | https://www.nps.gov/grsm/index.htm